Read the science

We have collected a selection of important scientific articles and other research on Far UV-C light and its effect on pathogens and people.



Far UV-C light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses

This  peer-reviewed article from Scientific Reports, shows that continuous Far UV-C exposure in occupied public locations at the current regulatory exposure limit (~3 mJ/cm2/hour) would result in ~90% viral inactivation in ~8minutes, 95% in ~11minutes, 99% in ~16minutes and 99.9% inactivation in ~25minutes. Thus while staying within current regulatory dose limits, low-dose Far UV-C exposure has the potential to safely provide a major reduction in the ambient level of airborne coronaviruses in occupied public locations.  

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Far UV-C light: A new tool to control the spread of airborne-mediated microbial diseases

In this  peer-reviewed article from Scientific Reports,  it is shown for the first time that Far UV-C efficiently inactivates airborne aerosolized viruses, with a very low dose of 2mJ/cm2 of 222 nm light inactivating >95% of aerosolized H1N1 influenza virus. Continuous very low dose-rate Far UV-C light in indoor public locations is a promising, safe and inexpensive tool to reduce the spread of airborne-mediated microbial diseases.

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Long‐term Effects of 222 nm ultraviolet radiation C Sterilizing Lamps on Mice Susceptible to Ultraviolet Radiation

This  peer-reviewed article  it is shown for the first time that Far UV-C efficiently inactivates airborne aerosolised viruses, with a very low dose of 2mJ/cm2 of 222 nm light inactivating >95% of aerosolized H1N1 influenza virus. Continuous very low dose-rate Far UV-C light in indoor public locations is a promising, safe and inexpensive tool to reduce the spread of airborne-mediated microbial diseases. 

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Evaluation of acute corneal damage induced by 222-nm and 254-nm ultraviolet light in Sprague-Dawley rats

This  peer-reviewed article   evaluated acute corneal damage induced by 222 and 254 nm UV light in albino rats. In the study, no corneal damage was induced by 222 nm UV light, which suggests that 222 nm UV light may not harm rat eyes within the energy range and may be useful for sterilising or preventing infection in the future.

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Chronic irradiation with 222 nm UVC light induces neither DNA damage nor epidermal lesions in mouse skin, even at high doses

In this study, chronic irradiation with 222 nm UV-C light was revealed not to induce mutagenic or cytotoxic effects in the epidermis of mice. These results indicated that 222 nm UV-C light emitted from the lamp apparatus (or device), which was designed to attenuate harmful light present in wavelengths of more than 230 nm, represents a promising tool for the reduction of SSI incidence in inpatients and hospital staff.

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